Monthly Archives: February 2016

The CSIRO spat that Australia can’t afford to ignore

The future of climate research in Australia is an issue tailor-made for Malcolm Turnbull to take a stand on. Yet he remains aloof from the debate. A notable centenary happens next month. On March 16, 1916, a young Australian nation … Continue reading

Posted in agriculture and farming, astrophysics, atmospheric science, Australian politics, changes to climate, climate politics, climate system, coastal management, computer science, CSIRO, economic activity, economic threat from climate, energy, future climate, international politics, land use, leadership, local economy, marine sciences, modelling, oceanography, organisations and events, planning, renewable energy, science, temperature | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Smashing headlights is no way to prepare for the future

A Hobart meeting discussing the biggest global issue of them all highlights our dire need for more climate knowledge. If the Turnbull government still needs convincing that we need all the climate modelling and analysis we can get our hands … Continue reading

Posted in Antarctic, Arctic, atmospheric science, Australian politics, biodiversity, biological resources, carbon, carbon emissions and targets, changes to climate, climate politics, climate system, ecology, economic threat from climate, future climate, leadership, modelling, ocean acidification, planning, science, Tasmanian politics, temperature, trees, wildlife management | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

How they took Earth’s temperature – and found a fever

It isn’t just that last year was warmer than ever. It’s the fact that every analysis shows the amount of warming last year was without precedent. It isn’t easy to get the head around how science worked out that Earth’s surface … Continue reading

Posted in atmospheric science, Australian politics, Bureau of Meteorology, bureaucracy, changes to climate, climate politics, climate system, CSIRO, extreme events, science, sea level, temperature | Leave a comment