Tag Archives: Guy Callendar

Waiting, waiting for a sign from heaven

Are we waiting for a non-negotiable climate change signal? [20 January 2015 | Peter Boyer] With one-seventh of the 21st century already gone (can you believe it?), it’s time to take stock. A warning: readers may find the following depressing. … Continue reading

Posted in atmospheric science, Australian politics, bureaucracy, business interests, business, investment, employment, carbon, carbon emissions and targets, changes to climate, climate politics, climate system, coal-fired, contrarians, education, electricity networks, emissions trading, energy, fossil fuels, future climate, human behaviour, international politics, leadership, local government, public opinion, renewable energy, science, social and personal issues, Tasmanian politics, water, wildfire | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

How climate change is changing us

Keynote address to plenary session 2010 School Conference, School of Geography and Environmental Studies, University of Tasmania, Hobart, 2 July 2010. View YouTube video here and here. [3 July 2010 | Peter Boyer] [Professor] Elaine Stratford [head, School of Geography and … Continue reading

Posted in addresses-talks, agriculture and farming, Antarctic, arts, Australian politics, biodiversity, biological resources, built environment, bureaucracy, carbon, carbon emissions and targets, carbon sequestration, changes to climate, climate politics, climate system, coal-fired, community action, consumption, contrarians, cycling, economic activity, economic threat from climate, education, emissions trading, energy, energy conservation, energy efficiency, environmental degradation, forests and forestry, fossil fuels, future climate, gardening, growth, ice, land use, leadership, local economy, ocean acidification, oceanography, peak oil, population, psychology, public opinion, rail, science, scientific method, sea level, social and personal issues, social mindsets, solar, Southern Ocean, Tasmanian politics, tourism, Transition, transport, trees, walking, waste, wind, workplace issues | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Facing the sustainability challenge

The task of reducing carbon emissions is a very tough one, for politicians and the rest of us alike, but it is not an impossible one. We need to put our fears aside and take the plunge into a new way of seeing and doing things. Continue reading

Posted in addresses-talks, Australian politics, carbon, carbon emissions and targets, changes to climate, climate politics, climate system, community action, economic activity, economic threat from climate, emissions trading, Garnaut, inertia, inquiries and reports, leadership, public opinion, social and personal issues, social mindsets, Tasmanian politics | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Facing the sustainability challenge